Ancient Honeymen

Close-up of one of the ancient beehives found at Tel Rehov in Israel. These two sites, cnn.com and anthropology.net both cover the recent story of a 3000 year old beehive that was unearthed at Tel Rehov in Israel’s Beth Shean Valley. While both sites skim over the possibilities of what the hives mean and their construction, they take a slightly different view on how ancient beehives might have been worshiped. Cnn.com casually glimpses over how small religious figures were found near the hives. Anthropology.net does mention the possibility of religion, but abhors even discussing it and giving credence to Biblical evidence by giving you the link to it, and nothing else.

Putting aside the bombardment of biblical references this press release has, the findings of one of the first apiaries known dating from the 10th to early 9th centuries B.C.E…..

Anthropology.net does quote a large section of article that does contain bits about an altar and religious practices, but they decided to let you form your own opinions on the Bible as historical evidence of ancient Israel. Anthropology.net just quotes the men leading the research team Amihai Mazar and Eleazar L. Sukenik, and their hypothesis as to what the figurines represent

Cultic objects were also found in the apiary, including a four-horned altar adorned with figures of naked fertility goddesses, as well as an elaborately painted chalice. This could be evidence of deviant cultic practices by the ancient Israelites related to the production of honey and beeswax.

Here, Amihai Mazar and Eleazar L. Sukenik mention nothing of the Bible. They only hypothesize that there might have been cult worship to bring about a greater honey bounty. The article that Anthropology.net wont touch, but links to is filled with how every small thing is linked to passages in the Bible, even the mysterious jar “to nmsh” Without any other historical evidence, the religious site attributes the jars to Nimshi, a possibly fictional character in the Bible. This is probably why Anthropology.net and Cnn.com wont touch the possible religious nature of the artifacts. Without direct historical evidence, a third source is attributing the time frame and location to figures in the Bible, which has not been proven to be a historically accurate book of evidence and data.

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